Problem solving in physical science: for nonscience majors.
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Problem solving in physical science: for nonscience majors. by Bernard Fryshman

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Published by Addison-Wesley Pub. Co. in Reading, Mass .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Physics -- Problems, exercises, etc.

Book details:

Classifications
LC ClassificationsQC32 .F87
The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 211 p.
Number of Pages211
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5698719M
LC Control Number70109510

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  Tillery's Physical Science (appx. $99) isn't written in a linear fashion, so instructors can feel free to skip around to their liking. Regardless of how you approach it, you'll experience a method that combines real-world, problem-solving skills with theoretical exploration. The goal of this course, which was taught for the first time in the school year, is to provide nonscience majors with a quantitative understanding of science and technology. The course fulfills the University's Physical Science requirement and is open to students who are not science, math, or engineering majors.   Problem-solving tasks are frequently used to examine innovation and cognitive performance. Multiple processes and mechanisms may underlie such problem-solving, including noncognitive ones, such as motivation or neophobia (14–16). Nevertheless, an individual that can open different problem boxes, especially multistep ones involving sequential. Physical Science, Ninth Edition, is a straightforward, easy-to-read, but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science courses.

  Consistent with previous editions of An Introduction to Physical Science, the goal of the new Fourteenth edition is to stimulate students' interest in and gain knowledge of the physical sciences. Presenting content in such a way that students develop the critical reasoning and problem-solving skills that are needed in an ever-changing technological world, the authors emphasize fundamental 4/5(2). "Physical Science, Seventh Edition", is a straightforward, easy-to-read, but substantial introduction to the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It is intended to serve the needs of non-science majors who are required to complete one or more physical science s: However, there is a small but growing group of science faculty members who have developed ways to engage students in the process of thinking, questioning, and problem solving despite the large class size. Strategies in use in introductory courses in biology and geology are described in the sidebars. and multiple semesters. In manyclasses, students experienced significant attitudinal shifts in the problem-solving categories of the CLASS, despite the conceptual focus of most PbI courses. Exams are open book and open notes, but require students teachers and 75% other nonscience majors seeking to fulfill a physical science.